• Thanks for stopping by. Logging in to a registered account will remove all generic ads. Please reach out with any questions or concerns.

Asthma & the CF (merged thread)

Status
Not open for further replies.

Jarnhamar

Army.ca Legend
Reaction score
3,234
Points
1,060
Atominthesky said:
Unfortunately I think I need to bow out. I don't think I can justify spending the next 6 months re-schooling to apply, go through the CFAT, interviews, maybe even as far as aircrew selection ultimately to face a high chance of rejection for something out of my control. Frustrating to say the least.

You could do all that make it to basic training then slip on ice and ruin your back.  If it's not going to put you at a crazy financial hardship then try it. At least you can say you tried instead of always wondering.
 

Atominthesky

Guest
Reaction score
0
Points
0
medicineman said:
What he said...like I said, get the test and go through the process.  if the test is full blown positive, then maybe call it quits - at least you did what you could then.

MM

Many of the threads and posts I read are about applicants stating they used to have asthma when they were kids, blah blah blah, they don't have it anymore and have to jump through hoops to prove they don't. Fair enough. However in my case, I can guarantee any tests done by a respirologist, including a methacholine test, the CF and even my own family doctor will prove without a shadow of a doubt I DO have asthma, and do require medication, however infrequent. I won't hide that fact. I know it's unaffected by intense exercise. It's a matter of time really, after about 48 hours my lungs begin to get a little inflamed, and really it's more of an annoyance trying to sleep then anything. So I use symbicort for comfort reasons.

So really my question right now is simple, does the CF accept asthmatics or not?

If it's always a NO, no matter how mild the case, I will move on to another career path immediately. If it's a YES, based on stipulations of scores and doctor's notes, then I will jump into this with everything I have.
 

ModlrMike

Army.ca Veteran
Subscriber
Donor
Reaction score
836
Points
960
Atominthesky said:
So really my question right now is simple, does the CF accept asthmatics or not?

The question may be simple, but the answer is not. Each case is judged individually. Only the recruiting system can answer this question definitively.

As was posted up-thread, no one here will be able to give you the answers you seek.
 

Tomyallen

Guest
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Hello everyone,
As you can see I am new to these forums. I have been reading through them as a guest the past few days looking for answers and have thankfully been finding a lot of very useful information. I do have one question though that I can't recent answers to.

I'm a 23 year old female who is extremely interested in joining the military. My first big choice was Military Police considering my educational background however things such as Infantry and Artillery are also extremely interesting to me.

However I'm also an asthmatic. Was diagnosed very young and have been medicated for it for as long as I can remember. However I am what you would describe as a-symptomatic. I have read through the Asthma post's and understand it is difficult to get recruited with this-not impossible-and will require some extra work on my end to get clearance.

What I am looking for though is to speak with people who have asthma but have made it through the entire recruiting process and into Basic. What was the experience like and what if any impact did your asthma actually have? Is there anything you can do in advance to make that process easier? Did you ever use your meds in Basic or were you well enough not to need them?

Thanks in advance to reading this over and responding if you can.
 

medicineman

Army.ca Fixture
Reaction score
570
Points
1,010
Having done the medicals, it all depends upon symptom management, triggers, and positive/negative respiratory testing.  One of my kids has been going through a pile of BS because, despite negative methocholine challenges, the fact he's been treated for "asthma" when he likely had bronchitis, ends up holding up his medical file.

MM
 

Parabellum02

Guest
Reaction score
0
Points
60
Hello everyone, I'm new to this website but have a question regarding asthma that (as far as I can see) has not been answered.

When I was a child, I had very mild asthma, however, Recently I did a pulmonary test that confirmed I did NOT have it anymore. My question is; Would I be allowed to bring an old inhalator of mine to BMQ anyways? Once again, I don't actually need it, and I can prove that I don't need it, I would just feel a little more comfortable knowing that one was around me in the extremely unlikely event that I actually did need it.

Also, note that I applied for the reserves, which I hear is slightly more laid back than the reg force when it comes to BMQ prescription regulations, and I have already successfully finished the recruitment process (including the medical of course) and am waiting to be sworn in, hopefully shortly. Thanks.

 
 

ModlrMike

Army.ca Veteran
Subscriber
Donor
Reaction score
836
Points
960
It is an offence to use medication for which you do not hold a valid prescription. I can't see that being relaxed in BMQ, reserves being laid back notwithstanding.
 

sarahsmom

Full Member
Reaction score
9
Points
230
Parabellum02 said:
Hello everyone, I'm new to this website but have a question regarding asthma that (as far as I can see) has not been answered.

When I was a child, I had very mild asthma, however, Recently I did a pulmonary test that confirmed I did NOT have it anymore. My question is; Would I be allowed to bring an old inhalator of mine to BMQ anyways? Once again, I don't actually need it, and I can prove that I don't need it, I would just feel a little more comfortable knowing that one was around me in the extremely unlikely event that I actually did need it.

Also, note that I applied for the reserves, which I hear is slightly more laid back than the reg force when it comes to BMQ prescription regulations, and I have already successfully finished the recruitment process (including the medical of course) and am waiting to be sworn in, hopefully shortly. Thanks.

The only way they are more relaxed is that all medication brought to Reserves BMQ does not have to be prescribed by the MIR.
What concerns me is if you have been cleared of asthma, so you don't have asthma, why are you being prescribed an asthma inhaler?  If it's not a recent prescription, how old is it? Medication loses its effectiveness after a time.
And if you have an asthma attack on course, or are even seen using your inhaler while on course, you WILL be sent to the ER or MIR (depending on where your BMQ is being held and when) and this could be cause for irregular enrolment. The BMQ staff are not medical, and taking meds you told them you did not need means you need to be reevaluated for your medical fitness to serve.
Not trying to scare you, but this is serious stuff.
 

Parabellum02

Guest
Reaction score
0
Points
60
paleomedic said:
The only way they are more relaxed is that all medication brought to Reserves BMQ does not have to be prescribed by the MIR.
What concerns me is if you have been cleared of asthma, so you don't have asthma, why are you being prescribed an asthma inhaler?  If it's not a recent prescription, how old is it? Medication loses its effectiveness after a time.
And if you have an asthma attack on course, or are even seen using your inhaler while on course, you WILL be sent to the ER or MIR (depending on where your BMQ is being held and when) and this could be cause for irregular enrolment. The BMQ staff are not medical, and taking meds you told them you did not need means you need to be reevaluated for your medical fitness to serve.
Not trying to scare you, but this is serious stuff.

Thanks for the reply, that answers my question.
 

nic32

Jr. Member
Reaction score
0
Points
0
I applied for Pilot and did my medical part 1 in October. Since I have inhalers because of allergies to dogs, they asked me to do some others tests. I did the Methacholine test and a pulmonary function test.

My pulmonary function test went good, everything is fine. However, the Methacholine test showed that I have very light asthma, not a surprise to me.

I received a letter yesterday. It says that my medical file is refused because I have asthma. I do not know what to say. I only take my inhalers when in contact with dogs. Also, I never did an asthma attack. My family doctor said the same things on the form and that it was no big deal.

Plus, I did the medical + medical part 2 back in 2012 and 2013 for Pilot and all was fine. Also, I did the medical again in 2014 and was accepted as a comm guy in the reserves.

Now, since I only applied for Pilot, I'm not sure if the rejection is generalized or only for Pilot. I'm going to call the CFRC Monday to have more details.

I can challenge the decision (at least, the letter says so) and sure I will do.
 

kreeptik

Guest
Reaction score
0
Points
0
I want to apologize in advance for my poor english since I am a french Canadian.

Here my story : Three months ago, I received a letter of refusal because I had asthma at a young age. In that letter, they said I needed to take a metacholine test to see if I still had it.Today, I received my results and my spirometry is normal (drop of 14% in 16mg / ml) and that I have no hyper bronchial reactivity non-specific. Hopefully, that's good enough for me to live my dream of becoming an infantryman!

All that to say, if you struggle to join the Canadian Forces due to medical problems, do not let go. Just like you guys, I wanted to come out clean and say the truth, but if you know you do not have it anymore, then follow the steps and one day your day will come! Just visualize this as a mental toughness test. You will experience way worst once you're part of Canadian Forces, so you can't think that way already.

P.S I know it's difficult, i'm still in the process and god knows if my score is good enough for them, but one thing I know is I have perseverance and I won't back down!

Love from Quebec.
Kreeptik


 

Loachman

Former Army Pilot in Drag
Staff member
Directing Staff
Reaction score
451
Points
980
No need to apologize - you write better than some primarily English-speaking people here. I didn't even notice an accent.

Most of us like good news like this.

"But one thing I know is I have perseverance and I won't back down!". Excellent attitude.

Qapla.
 

nic32

Jr. Member
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Little follow-up:

I appealed the decision in May and I received another letter yesterday saying that I still do not meet the medical standard. Still, they don't say in the letter what has changed since my release of the PRes in 2015 even if I asked explicitly. Maybe, they can't share that. Well, I guess my military life is over.

Thanks to everybody on this website helping each other and sharing useful information :)

See ya,

Nick
 

Jarnhamar

Army.ca Legend
Reaction score
3,234
Points
1,060
Nick,

Sorry to hear things turned out that way for you.
Try not to take it too personally. Not too long ago a friend of mine who served in Afghanistan was diogonosed with asthma.  Despite not having any attacks or restrictions for pt he was removed from training for a tour overseas because the docs felt it was too risky sending him.

It may not be what you're looking for exactly but consider looking into becoming a cadet officer and see if you're allowed despite the asthma.

If you can get in there then you'll be helping young kids, many of whom eventually find themselves in the military. Guiding tomorrow's soldiers. Very worthy cause IMO.
 

war2001v

Jr. Member
Reaction score
0
Points
60
Nic if I can share my experience I got a medical rejection letter that had almost NO info I could draw from, but I just emailed a med tech from the recruiters office and told him what the letter said and he was able to tell me what I needed my doctors to prove for me to get accepted, did you try emailing your CFRC or someone for help?
 

NotEZ24Get

Guest
Reaction score
0
Points
0
This read may be rather long, I hope you take the time to read my experience and coming conclusions.

I enrolled nearly 5 years ago as an overseas candidate.  I spent nearly $20k travelling back & forth between interviews and processing as required during the recruitment process.

I am an older applicant.
I wanted to enlist as an officer.
I wrote the CFAT and my scores qualified me for all trades.
I was successful in the MARS exam.
My interviews went well.
My background investigation was a literal nightmare since I have been overseas for an extended period of time.  It took literally 'years' to get my clearances which all were successful.
My educational background & employment history is rather extensive and unique.
I wanted 1 particular trade (training & development officer) to which I was told I would never be offered since the position was extremely competitive and they don't come up very often.

I had only 1 concern.  Since childhood I have always been told I have asthma.  I have been told to carry an inhaler & have done so religiously since it has been always drilled into my head since I was in elementary school to keep one with you.

I can ride 140km on a bike for 5 hours and feel awesome.  I can run 10km and laugh it off.  My resting pulse during the summer can be in the 30's.  I have always been and am 100% confident in my physical ability.  Regardless of my extensive education & work experience, I pride myself on my fitness before anything else.

On point of principle, I refused to lie about my childhood asthma & my inhaler use during my medical.  During my initial medical, I was asked to fill out forms of medications currently used.  I checked the box listing 'asthma' as a condition I have always been branded having & ventolin since I do have a blue inhaler.  I also checked Propecia since I don't like worrying about hair loss and have a sense of vanity.

I was very upfront about it.  I stated I have been diagnosed with asthma and have had taken inhalers because they really do help with the smog in East Asia during some bad days.  The medical tech listened and wrote everything down and asked me 'when was the last time you were hospitalized'?  To which I answered 13. Why were you hospitalized? She asked me.  Because if you wheeze at all, your mom grabs you by the arm, throws you in the car an takes you to the hospital...it's not like you have a choice in the matter.  She smiled and seemed to understand my sentiment.  Do you still use it?  Yes, I replied.  When do you use it?  When the air from China comes and the smog really makes it hard to breathe.  Inhalers are prescribed and they cost $1.  They also make it feel easier to breathe.  Do you need it before exercise?  No.  Do you need it after exercise?  No.  We discussed my inhaler use, how my lungs felt and she seemed to think my breathing was more from allergies than asthma.  I expressed my surprise and suspicion since my whole life I have been told I have asthma.  On really shitty days, I use an inhaler & 1 puff puts you at ease.  She listened to my lungs and all seemed fairly good.

Reading all the content on this site was both disheartening since there were those who stated they were rejected due to asthma & those who stated they did over a decade with it. 

Last year I did the entire medical again and I did not check the asthma box.  I was emailed about it since my previous medical stated I used inhalers on occasion because of my asthma and she wanted to clarify the issue.  The fact I had been diagnosed with asthma in the past and use an inhaler did not kill my application.  I told her that there were times when the smog was so bad I used the inhaler and was grateful it worked so well.  We discussed my usage and she stated she would have to forward my medical report to the RMO in order to get the final word.  Several weeks later I was declared Med FIT. 

I was not required to do any asthma test or provide any documentation.  I stated yes I've been diagnosed with asthma, I've been told I have it all my life and I do have an inhaler.  However, it has been over 30 years since I was hospitalized for asthma.  How much did this affect my file I have no idea.

Fast forward to a few days ago I received an email from my recruiter and later spoke with him on the phone.  He informed me I have been chosen for the position of training & development officer.  I was informed I would be receiving a formal offer in the coming weeks via email.  I will of course accept the offer and looked at the gov't website regarding what you are to bring with you to basic.

Prescriptions
Copy of marriage certificate.

I will of course be providing my prescriptions for Propecia and Ventolin as they were declared during my medical.  I have yet to figure out how to get an 'authenticated' copy of my marriage certificate in a manner that is simple and easy.

To say I am looking forward to basic would be an understatement.  I have been in processing for over 5 years.  It would have been extremely unprofessional to lie about any medical condition that could affect your performance.  It would be stupid to believe that one may lie about their health records which may be uncovered.  A good rule of thumb being if it has been written down officially, then it is there FOREVER.  Do not lie...  If you do, you will always be known as the guy who lied on your application. 

So yes, I stated I was diagnosed with asthma, I used an inhaler in the past and I was declared medically fit.  My experience seems to go against the grain of many other experiences here, but I am happy it did.
 

Blackadder1916

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
1,068
Points
1,160
NotEZ24Get said:
I will also add some research results that may answer some questions for some, require you to modify your entry plans for others & provide actual insight as to the medical processes that are at play during the recruitment process.  . . .

I hope this helps...

I applaud your attempt to provide some advice based on your experience and interpretation of med stds, however much of what you passed on has little or no application for an individual applying to the CAF.  Yes, each occupation has a minimum medical standard and it may vary widely between occupations, however, for applicants the only standard that (generally) applies is the Common Enrolment Medical Standard (CEMS) which is 4 3 2 2 2 5.  If the standard for a particular occupation has a higher standard (which usually only applies to vision, colour vision and hearing) then that factor must be met.  Meeting geo/occ factors of G2 O2 (these are the factors that apply to existing/previous medical conditions, need for medical care and general physical condition) is the same whether an applicant has chosen pilot, infantryman, signals or any other MOC available to someone off the street.

The medical standards are not just used to judge applicants.  Throughout a member's career, he/she must still meet the minimum medical standard for his occupation.  It is when one falls below that standard that career action may be taken, i.e. retain in the service either with or without restrictions or release.  It is for that purpose the Medical Risk Matric (that you quoted and linked) was developed and is most used - it generally has little use in the enrolment process; an applicant is either fit or not fit, they are not enrolled with employment limitations.  The Risk Matric deals with "translating MELs of members with significant medical conditions" so that the career administration folks can decide whether it is worthwhile to keep them in the service.

You noticed that some occupations have a minimum GO factor of G2O2 while others may be G3O3.  This is an indication of the ability to employ individuals with some minor (and some significant) medical conditions without disrupting the posting plot or affecting the operational capability of units.  Better examples would have been to compare Infantryman to Infantry Officer (worker bees and managers in the same units) the GO factors are the same 22.  Whereas Signals Officer (G3 O3) in comparison to the soldiers they usually lead, Army Communication & Information Systems Specialist (ACISS) with G2 O2 shows a difference.  This is because it is easier to employ a Signals Officer as he ages (and develops medical conditions like the rest of the aging population) in non physically demanding jobs than it is to employ similarly aging Infantry Officers.
 

kratz

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Donor
Reaction score
119
Points
880
The topic has been answered.


Sadly, LOCKED.


**Staff**
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top