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CO of Hal relieved

Oldgateboatdriver

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Just a small point of vocab, Jarnhammar. While Captain is a colloquialism for any person heading a ship's crew, the actual designation for a commissioned vessel is Commanding Officer (CO) and for a military but not commissioned vessel (such as the Orca) the designation is Officer in Charge (OIC). In the merchant services, the designation is Master.

Therefore, your "A Captain of a navy ship was fired from being a Captain of a navy ship" could be rendered as "A ship's Commanding Officer was removed from command".

Sorry, I know, Pedantic. I plead the fifth.
 

Jarnhamar

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This is one thing that doesn't make sense in the CAF. If you screw up so bad that you lose Command, you probably shouldn't be collecting that big fat salary anymore and should be shown the door.
Probably have to leverage it against what we can afford to lose. I've seen officers and SNCOs that "weren't allowed to be in charge of troops". Incompetence driven, not medically.

A couple years ago I cross paths with FSA Sergeant who didn't want to sergeant anymore. His job was photocopying paper, pulling staples out of paper, and shredding paper. If it was up to me I'd demote him to private. Maybe we should have a pte/2lt payscale for people who can't do their job (without a medical reason).
 

daftandbarmy

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Probably have to leverage it against what we can afford to lose. I've seen officers and SNCOs that "weren't allowed to be in charge of troops". Incompetence driven, not medically.

A couple years ago I cross paths with FSA Sergeant who didn't want to sergeant anymore. His job was photocopying paper, pulling staples out of paper, and shredding paper. If it was up to me I'd demote him to private. Maybe we should have a pte/2lt payscale for people who can't do their job (without a medical reason).

Or get rid of them, like most other organizations do with chronically poor performers.
 

Bruce Monkhouse

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Or get rid of them, like most other organizations do with chronically poor performers.
But most organizations don't look down on those who don't want to 'go higher" like they are the scum of the earth. Lets face it, stay in long enough and almost everyone is one step above their competency level, and a lot of times not from choice.
 

Humphrey Bogart

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Disagree. Some folks are damn good staff officers but sucked/would suck as CO. Sometimes, the system pushes those great staff officer onto the succession plan to their detriment.
Then they shouldn't have been there in the first place. Let's be honest as well, very few COs (almost none in fact) get removed for "Performance" issues. (Because performance really doesn't actually matter for the most part in the CAF).

They do get removed for "Conduct" issues though and they should be sent packing if they are found to be complacent to poor conduct.

Probably have to leverage it against what we can afford to lose. I've seen officers and SNCOs that "weren't allowed to be in charge of troops". Incompetence driven, not medically.

A couple years ago I cross paths with FSA Sergeant who didn't want to sergeant anymore. His job was photocopying paper, pulling staples out of paper, and shredding paper. If it was up to me I'd demote him to private. Maybe we should have a pte/2lt payscale for people who can't do their job (without a medical reason).
If someone is garbage at their job, it would be better if they weren't even there 😉.

If an Officer gets removed from Command or the organization determines they aren't a fit for whatever reason, they should just resign and go do something else.

If I was removed from Command or had some other slight committed against me I would personally consider it an attack on my honour and would resign out of principle.
 

Dana381

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That's true, he still has his a job. That point might be lost on the the public though. A Captain of a navy ship was fired from being a Captain of a navy ship, so what are we going to pay him $130,000 a year to do?

The Navy has come a far way transparency wise, but is it far enough? Do they need to go father?

I'm not sure we need to communicate everything we do to the public just so Joe Dirt from Twitter can get their two cents in on how we should do our business.

Then again, there seems to be some times where the CAF's response has been "it's not a big deal" and the public said "yes, actually it is a big deal". Cue senior leaders apologizing for not getting it. So maybe we do need to be babysat by the public.

Everybody needs accountability or bad shit happens, the CAF apparently hasn't had enough lately.
 

daftandbarmy

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Everybody needs accountability or bad shit happens, the CAF apparently hasn't had enough lately.

In contrast, I just saw this in the news. Suncor seems to be flexing their accountability muscles these days:


Suncor says president and CEO Mark Little has stepped down​


Suncor Energy Inc. chief executive Mark Little has stepped down as president and chief executive officer and resigned from its board of directors just one day after the company announced its oilsands operations have suffered another workplace fatality.

Little’s departure is effective immediately, the Calgary-based energy company said in a release Friday.

“Suncor is committed to achieving safety and operational excellence across our business, and we must acknowledge where we have fallen short and recognize the critical need for change,” said board chair Michael Wilson.

On Thursday, Suncor announced that a contractor had been killed at its Base Mine north of Fort McMurray, Alta., the latest in a string of workplace deaths and safety incidents that have plagued the energy giant. Since 2014, there have been at least 12 deaths at Suncor sites, more than all of its oilsands rivals combined.


 

Humphrey Bogart

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In contrast, I just saw this in the news. Suncor seems to be flexing their accountability muscles these days:


Suncor says president and CEO Mark Little has stepped down​


Suncor Energy Inc. chief executive Mark Little has stepped down as president and chief executive officer and resigned from its board of directors just one day after the company announced its oilsands operations have suffered another workplace fatality.

Little’s departure is effective immediately, the Calgary-based energy company said in a release Friday.

“Suncor is committed to achieving safety and operational excellence across our business, and we must acknowledge where we have fallen short and recognize the critical need for change,” said board chair Michael Wilson.

On Thursday, Suncor announced that a contractor had been killed at its Base Mine north of Fort McMurray, Alta., the latest in a string of workplace deaths and safety incidents that have plagued the energy giant. Since 2014, there have been at least 12 deaths at Suncor sites, more than all of its oilsands rivals combined.


Suncor has really crapped the bed the past couple of years. They should be making money hand over fist at the moment but have underperformed in a number of ways given their position and advantages they have over their competitors.

Cdn Natural Resources has performed far better and given better value for their shareholders over the past few years.
 

Dana381

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In contrast, I just saw this in the news. Suncor seems to be flexing their accountability muscles these days:


Suncor says president and CEO Mark Little has stepped down​


Suncor Energy Inc. chief executive Mark Little has stepped down as president and chief executive officer and resigned from its board of directors just one day after the company announced its oilsands operations have suffered another workplace fatality.

Little’s departure is effective immediately, the Calgary-based energy company said in a release Friday.

“Suncor is committed to achieving safety and operational excellence across our business, and we must acknowledge where we have fallen short and recognize the critical need for change,” said board chair Michael Wilson.

On Thursday, Suncor announced that a contractor had been killed at its Base Mine north of Fort McMurray, Alta., the latest in a string of workplace deaths and safety incidents that have plagued the energy giant. Since 2014, there have been at least 12 deaths at Suncor sites, more than all of its oilsands rivals combined.



12 Deaths since 2014 is unthinkable, I'm glad someone is being held accountable. As much as I would like to see someone charged with negligent homicide these problems usually happen when the company wide safety culture erodes. This erosion is usually the result of many bad decisions by many different people over a long period of time. When safety culture gets corrupted and lazy it usually takes a big shakeup to correct things. Hopefully this shakeup works and they turn around their safety practices.
 
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