• Thanks for stopping by. Logging in to a registered account will remove all generic ads. Please reach out with any questions or concerns.

Transgender in the CF (merged)

Blackadder1916

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
466
Points
1,030
PuckChaser said:
Yep, concur. I think the lesson here is that the CAF is going to do its absolute best to accommodate, but there are going to be bona fide operational requirements where its not possible, so a transgendered member (or member with medical limitations) is not going to be able to deploy to location X or be a member of trade Y.

Maybe my impression is wrong, but I get the sense that some believe that a transgendered individual would have so many MELs that it is the norm that they would (or should) be undeployable.  What unique medical (as opposed to adm, social and employment) accommodations do you imagine are required?  Are you thinking that they need mandatory intensive medical surveillance?  While it may be true during the early stages of transition once that is completed, it seems (according to what I've reviewed) that a standard monitoring regime of every 6 months or even every 12 months is adequate.  Seeing a primary care physician once every year and having some blood work done is no more onerous than that of aircrew, women or those over a certain age.  Maybe the need to take medication on a regular basis?  Yes they do, but so do a lot of other people who deploy, some for rather routine things (like birth control or other gynecological issues) or prophylaxis (malaria).  Depending on the medication regime selected for the individual there may be a requirement for weekly injections but that doesn't necessarily mean the individual has to attend a medical facility on those occasions.  Even if the trans person is hesitant to inject themselves, the CF deploys medical elements in support of missions at a much greater capability than in the days of yore when I first deployed operationally.  And since it was mentioned previously that "sailing" might be a problem, that would likely be no problem since warships have integral medical spaces and staff.
 

Eye In The Sky

Army.ca Fixture
Reaction score
417
Points
910
Blackadder1916 said:
And since it was mentioned previously that "sailing" might be a problem, that would likely be no problem since warships have integral medical spaces and staff.

That was me.  I believe CPFs have PAs, but not MOs?  I'm not sure how the medical side of this topic functions, but I am sure grateful to people who are contributing in an educational sense - I for appreciate it.

On the sailing side, if medical is not a hurtle, would port visits potentially be?  I don't know what ports are usual visits, what countries believe this topic is a legal one vice a social one.
 

PuckChaser

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Mentor
Reaction score
652
Points
1,060
Blackadder1916 said:
Maybe my impression is wrong, but I get the sense that some believe that a transgendered individual would have so many MELs that it is the norm that they would (or should) be undeployable.  What unique medical (as opposed to adm, social and employment) accommodations do you imagine are required?  Are you thinking that they need mandatory intensive medical surveillance?  While it may be true during the early stages of transition once that is completed, it seems (according to what I've reviewed) that a standard monitoring regime of every 6 months or even every 12 months is adequate.  Seeing a primary care physician once every year and having some blood work done is no more onerous than that of aircrew, women or those over a certain age.  Maybe the need to take medication on a regular basis?  Yes they do, but so do a lot of other people who deploy, some for rather routine things (like birth control or other gynecological issues) or prophylaxis (malaria).  Depending on the medication regime selected for the individual there may be a requirement for weekly injections but that doesn't necessarily mean the individual has to attend a medical facility on those occasions.  Even if the trans person is hesitant to inject themselves, the CF deploys medical elements in support of missions at a much greater capability than in the days of yore when I first deployed operationally.  And since it was mentioned previously that "sailing" might be a problem, that would likely be no problem since warships have integral medical spaces and staff.

I won't speak for EITS, but I know I was only speaking to the specifics of daily/weekly drug injections that might not be possible in austere environments (especially if something needs refrigeration).
 

Lumber

Army.ca Veteran
Donor
Reaction score
42
Points
530
Eye In The Sky said:
That was me.  I believe CPFs have PAs, but not MOs?  I'm not sure how the medical side of this topic functions, but I am sure grateful to people who are contributing in an educational sense - I for appreciate it.

On the sailing side, if medical is not a hurtle, would port visits potentially be?  I don't know what ports are usual visits, what countries believe this topic is a legal one vice a social one.

I've never heard of a ship going to Brunei, but there are other "common" ports that could be an issue for anyone in the LGBTQ community, including Dubai, Kuwait City, Doha, Salalah and Muscat (i.e. all middle eastern ports).

That being said, you're not suppose to flaunt your sexuality in those countries regardless of your gender identity or sexuality, so as long as you are being safe and respecting local customs, I don't see any reason why a trans person should be any less safe than the rest of the crew in these ports.

That being said, if I was in a leadership position aboard a ship visiting one of the ports where homosexuality was punishable by death, I would most definitely include that in my "sex, drugs and rock&roll" brief to the crew before they went ashore.

We don't ban civilian trans Canadians from travelling to these countries, why should we ban military trans Canadians from visiting these countries during port visits? Life's full of risks and these are adults; they can stay aboard if they feel it's too risky.
 

austinjames

Guest
Reaction score
0
Points
0
so i've found a ton of information about transitioning AFTER joining the military but i've yet to find anyone's experience about being in basic training after you've transitioned. does anyone have any experience of going to basic training as a trans man (or woman works too)?
 
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Hello everyone. I heard of this site a while ago but just now decided to join in hopes of hearing some experiences , voicing concerns and questions of my own and perhaps even make a friend or two! Anyway..

I am a 25 year old transgender woman. For years I had wanted to join the military  but had to put it off mainly due to my desire to have all my treatments complete so if I am hired to join I can do so without any "loose ends" . Joining the military as said has been a dream of mine, and my application is beginning. I don't see myself however getting in until 2020, as my surgery is a few months away as it is.

I suppose my main questions are:

- basic training, what is it like? How long is it? Is it true you go out on the field for like a week straight running on no more than 5 hours of sleep that entire week? I heard ther was one super intense week of training, whereas every other day of the week lights out is 2300-0500. And how gruelling is the exercise?

- postings, after basic do they give you a choice in your posting . I realize you go wherever needed but do they give you a choice of bases that your trade is needing or do they  just pack you up wherever ?

- deployment, after I join and finish my trade training is the possibility of being deployed good? Because I would be the in category of wanting to be in the position of being deployed

-advancement, I known there is a number of ranks in the forces and it takes time to rise up. I just wonder how you can do so? See I know a girl who's been in for 10 years and she's a Captian, my mothers husband has been in since 2001 and is still a Corporal. It just seems odd in a way and maybe someone could educate me here and that.

I'm sure I will have more question pop into my head at some point, but in the mean time thank you to those who are reading! It means a lot and I look forward hearing from you 🇨🇦  ;D
 
Reaction score
0
Points
0
I was looking for my original post and it was moved to this thread. Didn't even realize there was a thread already for this so if my above post looks redundant that is why. Sweet stuff tho!
 

Loachman

Former Army Pilot in Drag
Staff member
Directing Staff
Reaction score
451
Points
980
Welcome to Army.ca, AshleyMarie34.

There's a thread not only for this, but for almost any other topic as well.

Best advice: Start reading through pertinent existing threads. You'll get far more out of doing that. If, after doing some decent research, you still cannot find an answer, somebody with some experience in that area will most likely do his or her best to provide you with one.
 

lohocard

New Member
Reaction score
0
Points
110
austinjames said:
so i've found a ton of information about transitioning AFTER joining the military but i've yet to find anyone's experience about being in basic training after you've transitioned. does anyone have any experience of going to basic training as a trans man (or woman works too)?

Read my posts above in this thread ^ I am a trans man and went to basic after i transitioned. PM if you need to.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Hello everyone. I have decided im going join the forces and would appreciate any advice that could be beneficial to a successful career in the military.

A small background story. I am 25, grew up in a military household so I have a decent idea of what I'm getting myself into as opposed to no knowledge. I am well versed in moving from base to base too. I am also MtF transgender. I should be due for surgery late summer and plan to recover for the next few months after and hope to get my military process in a proper swing come new year. 

I realize that basic training is very laborious so I am beginning a new exercise routine. For now I plan to take it slower but by time of my joining, if accepted I hope to be able to do daily reps of sit ups, push up, squats to exceed well above the minimal requirements and well before training day 1 so I can be in shape for the exercises. That also includes the running requirements. I have also been told that sleep is restricted to shorter hours then most people in civilian life would enjoy so I am going to tinker with trying to go 5 hours of sleep for a while before basic so I can learn how to handle that , or have a better handling.

I realize that guns are a thing of the military, I mean how else is one going to fight off arses. That said I have some knowledge of guns as when I used to live in British Columbia as a kid I used to go to the shooting range with my father. It's been a few years since I last fired. I'm going to guess it will be well worth my time to invest going to a range. This may sound like a silly question but is there also a way of learning how to shoot precisely and accurately acceptable to standards?

Now if you're still reading (and thank you to those who are) you'll notice I admitted I am transgender. I realize being trans is not a red light to join as it can be elsewhere in the world. That said would anyone here at all have the slightest knowledge over how this could impact me in some other way? Again I don't plan to go to basic till next year, a while after surgery. I realize the military does provide coverage which is great but I had planned to get surgery before joining that way it wouldn't effect my learning of basic plus trade training (in addition to sooner peace). That said I will be on estrogen tablets for life.

Anyways thanks everyone and hope to hear back soon!
 

dangerboy

Army.ca Veteran
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
395
Points
910
AshleyMarie34 said:
This may sound like a silly question but is there also a way of learning how to shoot precisely and accurately acceptable to standards?

I would recommend not doing this. The CAF has lots of experience teaching people that have no experience how to use rifles and shoot, just follow your instructors points while you are on your basic course. It is harder to unlearn something once you have been taught something, and you might learn different drills/techniques which are different from the CAFs (not wrong drills just different).
 
Reaction score
0
Points
0
dangerboy said:
I would recommend not doing this. The CAF has lots of experience teaching people that have no experience how to use rifles and shoot, just follow your instructors points while you are on your basic course. It is harder to unlearn something once you have been taught something, and you might learn different drills/techniques which are different from the CAFs (not wrong drills just different).

Ok thanks for the heads up! I wasn't sure if I should or not but I puttered around with the idea. I want to be as prepared as possible, including doing exercises on my own initiative before basic but not so prepared that I end up doing it not the right way and have to relearn from scratch
 

Jarnhamar

Army.ca Legend
Reaction score
1,316
Points
1,060
[quote author=AshleyMarie34]

Now if you're still reading (and thank you to those who are) you'll notice I admitted I am transgender. I realize being trans is not a red light to join as it can be elsewhere in the world. That said would anyone here at all have the slightest knowledge over how this could impact me in some other way? Again I don't plan to go to basic till next year, a while after surgery. I realize the military does provide coverage which is great but I had planned to get surgery before joining that way it wouldn't effect my learning of basic plus trade training (in addition to sooner peace). That said I will be on estrogen tablets for life.
[/quote]

Dangerboy hit the bullet on the primer (har har). Admirable that you want to get training before you get training but don't.

As for being Transgender if you read through this thread you'll see that in some cases other soldiers will have no idea and you can successfully hide it if that's your thing.
No one should ever make fun or you or call you names, but I'm going to say it will happen. I'd suggest having thick skin (within reason) will help.
 
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Jarnhamar said:
Dangerboy hit the bullet on the primer (har har). Admirable that you want to get training before you get training but don't.

As for being Transgender if you read through this thread you'll see that in some cases other soldiers will have no idea and you can successfully hide it if that's your thing.
No one should ever make fun or you or call you names, but I'm going to say it will happen. I'd suggest having thick skin (within reason) will help.

Thank you very much! I may go what they call as stealth (where I do not tell anyone/ out myself) or may not. It's hard to say because even in my day to day life, outside of the people I have on my social media I don't really ever tell people about my situation. Like I don't hide it as I not ashamed of it, but I don't advertise it as I don't see a reason to have everyone I know know, if that makes sense.

As for some of the negative people I am not too phased by it as I couldn't care what others have to think about my life. Some people will never get along and even if no one knew about that part someone could still find some reason not to like me (like how I talk or what I like, etc) it's annoying, and transphobic nonsense adds that double whammy of it all and has the potential to escalade ones dislike even more so than the others reasons I listed, but people talking trash is generally something I brush off my shoulder, simply put screw em
 

kratz

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Donor
Reaction score
39
Points
630
AshleyMarie34,

The easiest way to learn from this site is to use this google search method:    "site:navy.ca    ***********  "

When you use the above method for BMQ topics, you will discover the concept "being the grey man".
It's not being stealth....it's simply fitting in so well that staff do not easily pick you because you always stand out.


 

BeyondTheNow

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Mentor
Reaction score
5
Points
530
kratz said:
AshleyMarie34,

The easiest way to learn from this site is to use this google search method:    "site:navy.ca    ***********  "

When you use the above method for BMQ topics, you will discover the concept "being the grey man".
It's not being stealth....it's simply fitting in so well that staff do not easily pick you because you always stand out.

To add to Kratz’s post, not everyone can be the grey man though. It’s okay to stand out, just make sure it’s for positive reasons and not negative ones.

In my experience, you really shouldn’t have any issues though. There was never a point where I was worried about someone seeing me naked. The bathrooms in both blue and green sector are either wholly private, or each individual shower area also has its own curtain/door to offer privacy from those using the sink area and toilets are also enclosed. Not only is no one actually allowed to be moving about their floors/common areas unclothed, but there’s simply never a reason to, period. You bring your stuff to and from the shower area/bathrooms with you.

Staff announces themselves when they enter the floor doors and if anyone is in any state of undress they’ll pause until it’s suitable to walk through. They also don’t walk into the bathrooms during patrols on occupied floors unless there’s an identified emergency. (Usually someone will just yell “I’m changing” or whatever, and they’ll wait.)

(For the most part) In the field, yes, there’s a much lesser expectancy of privacy. But generally, even if something does occur, at that point there’s decent enough platoon cohesion that no one will care. At that point everyone’s leaning on each other decently-well and everyone has the same-end goal in mind. A certain level of respect (even if certain people don’t get along individually) has developed and they just don’t care. All they care about is graduating.

Edit to add: During PT changing times, there are also stalls in the locker rooms if you don’t want to dress/undress openly. There’s always usually a couple who prefer to dart in there quickly. But everyone’s pretty much just focused on themselves while trying to get their shit altogether and pulling on clothes and whatnot over still-damp skin.
 

glxsskingdxm

Guest
Reaction score
0
Points
10
What is it like to enrol as someone who has already transitioned with hormones? Did any of you have hold ups in medical, or not being able to continue HRT in basic?
 
Top