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Transgender in the CF (merged)

QV

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To be fair, anything less than 30 years old is considered new in this org.
 

lohocard

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As a trans man (FTM) currently serving in the Forces for almost 2 years now, I can shed some light or try to answer some questions anybody may have on the topic.

After reading this entire thread, it still looks like people may want to be more educated. I'm still learning too (with the policies set in place in the military) even though I've been a legal male for over 5 years now.  ;D

Cheers
 

Jarnhamar

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lohocard said:
As a trans man (FTM) currently serving in the Forces for almost 2 years now, I can shed some light or try to answer some questions anybody may have on the topic.

I have a couple if you're offering.

What was the biggest obstacle for you joining and doing your initial training?

Being a FTM trans man what do you find is the hardest thing being in the CAF now that you're trained? (or two years later?

 

lohocard

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Jarnhamar said:
I have a couple if you're offering.

What was the biggest obstacle for you joining and doing your initial training?

Being a FTM trans man what do you find is the hardest thing being in the CAF now that you're trained? (or two years later?

The biggest obstacle for me joining was the the whole showering/change room situation. I have not undergone bottom surgery (for my reasons..if you want to know specifically I can discuss that) so it was hard for me to accept that I would be showering with possible assholes who would make comments. For me to join, I would do what I had to do, but if I found a way around it and to not deal with it, I would try.

So the second day of basic I went up to my Sgt who never dealt with a trans person before, I told him right off the bat that I was trans and that if I had to shower and change with everyone, I would, but that I didn’t want to deal with unnecessary harassment. He talked to the IC and it went up the chain. They agreed and were very accommodating to me. The Major brought me into his office and pointed out that everyone is still “learning and in the process of making the CF aware of trans people etc.” He gave me a chit to shower and change in a separate change room 10 ft away from the others.

No one in my platoon seemed bother by this, and barely noticed as I was always the first one out anyway after Pt. I was in the blue sector so changing and showering wasn’t a problem there due to privacy. I let my entire pod of 6 guys know that I was trans, and that if were gonna have a problem it was THEIR problem. They all agreed and didn’t care and carried on. The whole platoon probably found out later on in the course but there weren’t any problems. My instructors didn’t treat me any different from the rest, I got jacked up all the time as per lol.

As for the hardest thing NOW...well. I’ve passed well as a man that nobody on my base knows I’m trans. It’s not that I’m scared to tell them, it’s almost like why bother? Just see me as a soldier that does my job and if you find one for any reason, well whatever. Why bring it up unless it needs to be said? Nobody in Borden knew either (on QL3/other courses). There’s a private shower in the shacks.

The hardest thing for me will be going on deployment. I’ve talked to 3 doctors (st Jean, Borden, and on my home base) about bringing my HRT overseas. They seemed pretty uneducated and all said “let’s cross that bridge when we get to it” - which worries me a bit. I want to deploy, I want to go places in my career. Adding on to that, deploying and using the facilities there. People will probably find out eventually. Not sure how it works when that’ll happen. I suppose I may just have to confront people at that point.

Otherwise, work has been great, lol.


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AKa

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lohocard said:
The hardest thing for me will be going on deployment. I’ve talked to 3 doctors (st Jean, Borden, and on my home base) about bringing my HRT overseas. They seemed pretty uneducated and all said “let’s cross that bridge when we get to it” - which worries me a bit. I want to deploy, I want to go places in my career.

Depending on your trade and the role, simply bringing your meds on deployment may not be an issue.  Lots of us require daily meds and are still considered deployable.  I for one, need my thyroid meds daily or I will slowly turn into a paperweight.  Of course, I'm not on the pointy end so even on deployment I generally never lived too rough.

And yes, "going places" is the best part of this career!

Cheers,

AK
 

Scott

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lohocard,

Thanks a bunch for sharing - great insights for those curious.

Cheers
 

lohocard

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Scott said:
lohocard,

Thanks a bunch for sharing - great insights for those curious.

Cheers

It is with my pleasure. I’m glad people found it that way.



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Curious about non-binary genders, if you’re non binary (don’t associate with any genders) who’s dress regs would you have to abide by?
 

mariomike

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Somerandomfellow said:
Curious about non-binary genders, if you’re non binary (don’t associate with any genders) who’s dress regs would you have to abide by?

I don't know.

But, for reference to the discussion,

Lumber said:
No, because there is no option for "non-binary" in any official capacity within the CAF, < snip >
 

dimsum

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AK said:
Depending on your trade and the role, simply bringing your meds on deployment may not be an issue.  Lots of us require daily meds and are still considered deployable. 

Second that.  A fair percentage of aircrew are on airsickness meds, and we deploy all the time with no issues (on that end).  I don't take them, but I'd think that the ones that do take enough to last the entire deployment.
 

RogueSig

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As others have said, thanks for sharing Lohocard.

Following his example, I am MTF and would be open to answering questions as well. I have been serving 8 years now, and been openly trans for 1.

Regarding the non-binary question, this would be handled as apart of creating the member's Accommodation Plan, in accordance with the new guidance.
What would likely be seen is the member being granted female hair regs, as it gives freedom for long or short styles. Their DEU would likely not change, though again that would depend on how the plan was decided. It is very accurate that there is no official capacity for non-binary, and the plan would therefore be unique to the member and the unit they made it with.

Regarding Meds, there is nothing to stop you from goin on any tour AFTER your med dosages are deemed finalized by you ME/ENDO. Your employability overseas may be effected if the MO still feels you need regular blood work (not a medic, no clue what a field clinic can test).

There is one thing which does affect your deployability however, and that is the host nation. The military will not post an LGBT person to a place where they would be at an increased risk compared to their fellow soldiers. What this means is, in the case of deployments where the host nation has deemed trans people to be illegal, we cannot be deployed there. There are also postings where LGBT persons cannot be selected for the same reasons.
 

Jarnhamar

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[quote author=RogueSig]

There is one thing which does affect your deployability however, and that is the host nation. The military will not post an LGBT person to a place where they would be at an increased risk compared to their fellow soldiers. What this means is, in the case of deployments where the host nation has deemed trans people to be illegal, we cannot be deployed there. There are also postings where LGBT persons cannot be selected for the same reasons.
[/quote]

Would the CAF extend this policy, say, to a Jewish member of the CAF slated to deploy to Iraq or another strict Muslim country?
 

blacktriangle

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Jarnhamar said:
Would the CAF extend this policy, say, to a Jewish member of the CAF slated to deploy to Iraq or another strict Muslim country?

Or to say a female member slated to deploy into combat anywhere in the MENA region...
 

BeyondTheNow

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I’m just going to insert a preemptive MOD comment here...

Those questions are legitimate. And respectful, open, exploratory, dialogue is encouraged. However, you are both intelligent users and I know you can foresee the ways in which this thread could go downhill, and fast, with the spin those questions can encompass.

Therefore, everyone is to proceed with caution and thoughtfulness while this conversation goes forward.

This is the only warning.

Staff
 

Jarnhamar

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DetectiveMcNulty said:
Or to say a female member slated to deploy into combat anywhere in the MENA region...

That's a good question too. For me I look at it as a matter of fairness. Is it fair a single mbr might have to deploy twice because I hypothetically don't have my family care plan in order?

Some places we might go may very well present a very real danger to a trans member, not from an enemt but our partners.
Would it be fair then for a female member to refuse a deployment to an area they feel their gender may put them at an increased risk?
And of course one might also ask if the policy about trans members not being deployed to hostile countries is fair.
 

blacktriangle

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Jarnhamar said:
That's a good question too. For me I look at it as a matter of fairness. Is it fair a single mbr might have to deploy twice because I hypothetically don't have my family care plan in order?

Some places we might go may very well present a very real danger to a trans member, not from an enemt but our partners.
Would it be fair then for a female member to refuse a deployment to an area they feel their gender may put them at an increased risk?
And of course one might also ask if the policy about trans members not being deployed to hostile countries is fair.

The CAF doesn't like to ask the hard questions, as you know.

The CAF is going to send people into questionable situations for questionable reasons. I respect anyone brave enough to do that regardless of their status or background. With that said, I'd adrep lots of 9mm and thermite for them just in case. Anyways I guess I will leave this topic be.
 

Jarnhamar

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I don't want any member put in any more risk than they need to be but I hope we stick to a more robust view/approach.  A member of the CAF is a member of the CAF, get over your religious or cultural bias.  Because honestly we need every able bodied person we can get.
 

Strike

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It would likely be looked at more in the legality of things.  For example, I doubt that any trans member would even be considered for any kind of trip to Brunei given that country's current laws.

Again, it would all likely be addressed on a case-by-case basis and dependant on several factors.
 

Jarnhamar

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[quote author=Strike]  For example, I doubt that any trans member would even be considered for any kind of trip to Brunei given that country's current laws.

[/quote]
I had to google that place, sounds shitty. Interesting point, but trans members aren't nessairly homosexual. Do you think a non-trans, homosexual service member would have a good case not to deploy to Brunei?
 
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