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Divining the right role, capabilities, structure, and Regimental System for Canada's Army Reserves

daftandbarmy

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37 days, as in 37 full days or 37 half days ? Would you think that an transition to one weekend each month would be a better value that 4 class A nights ? Given the amount of training you get for the same “price” I mean.

That's 37 mandays, as in full days. This has to cover everything from AAG/DAG nights, range exercises, FTX events, training nights, Mandatory Online Courses, Admin/CQ stuff, Remembrance Day, Bde Concentrations etc etc. Sometimes you can scrape up additional mandays for courses.

I've been around the block with every conceivable type of training schedule over the years and have found that the one weekend per month, one night per week, is definitely the most effective.

Things change so fast that if you don't see the troops at least once per week, you quickly fall behind in being able to prepare for the latest 'fast ball'.

You also tend to lose people with 'real jobs' and families etc as their weekends are really important.
 

markppcli

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37.5 paid days, a mix of half and full days.

However, the rate of pay is based on calendar, not working days, so there is a de facto class A discount.
Can you explain the discount ? Or do you mean that the days are parted out monthly?
 

markppcli

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That's 37 mandays, as in full days. This has to cover everything from AAG/DAG nights, range exercises, FTX events, training nights, Mandatory Online Courses, Admin/CQ stuff, Remembrance Day, Bde Concentrations etc etc. Sometimes you can scrape up additional mandays for courses.

I've been around the block with every conceivable type of training schedule over the years and have found that the one weekend per month, one night per week, is definitely the most effective.

Things change so fast that if you don't see the troops at least once per week, you quickly fall behind in being able to prepare for the latest 'fast ball'.

You also tend to lose people with 'real jobs' and families etc as their weekends are really important.
Cheers for that, appreciate the perspective.
 

dapaterson

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Can you explain the discount ? Or do you mean that the days are parted out monthly?

Res F pay: Reg F monthly rate x 12, / 365, x 92.8%

So it is calculated on a calendar daily rate, not a working day rate.

If you are a full time reservist, you get the 92.8%. Part time, if you work notional full time hours for a week, you get five, not seven, days pay
 

markppcli

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To better create argument and bickering. I once again submit my proposed reorganization of the reserves into regional Bdes and roughly provincial regiments.

  • 10 Canadian Rifle Brigade
    • 11 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Seaforth Highlanders of Canada
      • B Coy (Canadian Scottish)
      • C Coy (Royal Westminster Regiment)
      • Combat Support (Rocky Mountain Rangers)
      • TAPV Sqn (British Columbia Dragoons / British Columbia Regiment)
    • 12 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Loyal Edmonton Regiment)
      • B Coy (Calgary Highlanders)
      • C Coy (Royal Regina Rifles)
      • Combat Support (North Sask Regiment)
      • TAPV Sqn (Sask Dragoons / Kings Own Calgary Regiment)
    • 13 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Royal Winnipeg Rifles)
      • B Coy ( Winnipeg Grenadiers)
      • C Coy (we don’t need two Cameron Highlanders, then at Ottawa can have a fight over it)
      • Combat Support (Lake Superior Scottish Regiment)
      • TAPV Sqn (Fort Gary Horse)
    • 10 Provisional Field Artillery Group
      • 3 x Field Battery
    • 10 Engineer Group
      • 3 x Field Sqn
    • 10 Support Bn
      • 3 x dispersed Support Groups
  • 20 Canadian Rifle Brigade
    • 21 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Royal Hamilton Light Infantry)
      • B Coy (Essex and Kent Scottish / Argyl and Sutherland Highlanders)
      • C Coy (Grey and Simcoe Foresters)
      • Combat Support (Royal Highland Fusiliers)
      • TAPV Sqn (Windsor Regiment)
    • 22 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Toronto Scottish / 48th Highlanders / Lorne Scots)
      • B Coy (Queens own Rifles of Canada)
      • C Coy (Royal Regiment of Canada)
      • Combat Support (Lincoln and Welland Regiment / Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment)
      • TAPV Sqn (Queens York Rangers)
    • 23 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Ontario Highlanders (Cameron, Stormont, Dundas and Glengary Highlanders))
        • Governor Generals Foot Guards (ceremonial)
      • B Coy (Irish Regiment of Canada)
      • C Coy (Princes of Wales own Regiment of Canada)
      • Combat Support (the Algonquin Regiment / Brockville Rifles)
      • TAPV Sqn (Ontario Regiment )
        • Governor Generals Horse Guards (ceremonial)
    • 20 Provisional Field Artillery Group
      • 3 x Field Battery
    • 20 Engineer Group
      • 3 x Field Sqn
    • 20 Support Bn
      • 3 x dispersed Support Groups
  • 30 Brigade du Voltigeur Canadian
    • 31 Voltigeur Canadian
      • A Coy (Black Watch of Canada)
        • Canadian Grenadier Guards (ceremonial)
      • B Coy (Regiment de Maisonnueve)
      • C Coy (Fusiliers Mont-Royal)
      • Combat Support (Royal Montreal Regiment)
      • TAPV Sqn (Royal Canadian Hussars / Regiment du Hull)
    • 32 Voltigeur Canadian
      • A Coy (Voltigeur du Quebec)
        • Citadel Guard (no longer wasting 2 R22R’s time)
      • B Coy (la Regiment de Chaudiere)
      • C Coy (la Regiment de Saguenay)
      • Combat Support (Fusilier de Sherbrooke et St Lauren)
      • TAPV Sqn (Sherbrooke Hussars)
    • 30 Provisional Field Artillery Group
      • 3 x Field Battery
    • 30 Engineer Group
      • 3 x Field Sqn
    • 30 Support Bn
      • 3 x dispersed Support Groups
  • 40 Canadian Rifle Brigade
    • 41 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Halifax Rifles)
      • B Coy (West Nova Scotia Regiment)
      • C Coy (Nova Scotia Regiment)
      • Combat Support (Cape Breton Highlanders)
      • TAPV Sqn (Princess Louise’s Fusiliers)
    • 42 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Royal Newfoundland Regiment)
      • B Coy (Royal New Brunswick Regiment)
      • C Coy (PEI Regiment)
      • Combat Support (The North Shore Regiment)
      • TAPV Sqn (8th Canadian Hussars)
    • 40 Provisional Field Artillery Group
      • 3 x Field Battery
    • 40 Engineer Group
      • 3 x Field Sqn
    • 40 Support Bn
      • 3 x dispersed Support Groups
The “dispersed support groups” function more as standards teams travelling and ensuring everyone is on the same page. I leave engineering groups fairly open as it’s not my area of expertise. The Artillery batteries would largely be provincial; and if necessary dispersed at troop level. The combat support companies are place holders, would be actually organized in large population centres to hopefully pull maximum numbers of trained pers. Some unit names have moved from RCAC to RCIC, that’s simply to ensure that we don’t hold capabilities in more isolated areas of the country. I’m sure they’ll be fine in their new roles. One key point would be that this gets away from small towns only having one unit available to them; The batteries and Sqns would have dets pushed out to give prospective young Canadians and breadth of options.
 

daftandbarmy

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To better create argument and bickering. I once again submit my proposed reorganization of the reserves into regional Bdes and roughly provincial regiments.

  • 10 Canadian Rifle Brigade
    • 11 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Seaforth Highlanders of Canada
      • B Coy (Canadian Scottish)
      • C Coy (Royal Westminster Regiment)
      • Combat Support (Rocky Mountain Rangers)
      • TAPV Sqn (British Columbia Dragoons / British Columbia Regiment)
    • 12 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Loyal Edmonton Regiment)
      • B Coy (Calgary Highlanders)
      • C Coy (Royal Regina Rifles)
      • Combat Support (North Sask Regiment)
      • TAPV Sqn (Sask Dragoons / Kings Own Calgary Regiment)
    • 13 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Royal Winnipeg Rifles)
      • B Coy ( Winnipeg Grenadiers)
      • C Coy (we don’t need two Cameron Highlanders, then at Ottawa can have a fight over it)
      • Combat Support (Lake Superior Scottish Regiment)
      • TAPV Sqn (Fort Gary Horse)
    • 10 Provisional Field Artillery Group
      • 3 x Field Battery
    • 10 Engineer Group
      • 3 x Field Sqn
    • 10 Support Bn
      • 3 x dispersed Support Groups
  • 20 Canadian Rifle Brigade
    • 21 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Royal Hamilton Light Infantry)
      • B Coy (Essex and Kent Scottish / Argyl and Sutherland Highlanders)
      • C Coy (Grey and Simcoe Foresters)
      • Combat Support (Royal Highland Fusiliers)
      • TAPV Sqn (Windsor Regiment)
    • 22 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Toronto Scottish / 48th Highlanders / Lorne Scots)
      • B Coy (Queens own Rifles of Canada)
      • C Coy (Royal Regiment of Canada)
      • Combat Support (Lincoln and Welland Regiment / Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment)
      • TAPV Sqn (Queens York Rangers)
    • 23 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Ontario Highlanders (Cameron, Stormont, Dundas and Glengary Highlanders))
        • Governor Generals Foot Guards (ceremonial)
      • B Coy (Irish Regiment of Canada)
      • C Coy (Princes of Wales own Regiment of Canada)
      • Combat Support (the Algonquin Regiment / Brockville Rifles)
      • TAPV Sqn (Ontario Regiment )
        • Governor Generals Horse Guards (ceremonial)
    • 20 Provisional Field Artillery Group
      • 3 x Field Battery
    • 20 Engineer Group
      • 3 x Field Sqn
    • 20 Support Bn
      • 3 x dispersed Support Groups
  • 30 Brigade du Voltigeur Canadian
    • 31 Voltigeur Canadian
      • A Coy (Black Watch of Canada)
        • Canadian Grenadier Guards (ceremonial)
      • B Coy (Regiment de Maisonnueve)
      • C Coy (Fusiliers Mont-Royal)
      • Combat Support (Royal Montreal Regiment)
      • TAPV Sqn (Royal Canadian Hussars / Regiment du Hull)
    • 32 Voltigeur Canadian
      • A Coy (Voltigeur du Quebec)
        • Citadel Guard (no longer wasting 2 R22R’s time)
      • B Coy (la Regiment de Chaudiere)
      • C Coy (la Regiment de Saguenay)
      • Combat Support (Fusilier de Sherbrooke et St Lauren)
      • TAPV Sqn (Sherbrooke Hussars)
    • 30 Provisional Field Artillery Group
      • 3 x Field Battery
    • 30 Engineer Group
      • 3 x Field Sqn
    • 30 Support Bn
      • 3 x dispersed Support Groups
  • 40 Canadian Rifle Brigade
    • 41 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Halifax Rifles)
      • B Coy (West Nova Scotia Regiment)
      • C Coy (Nova Scotia Regiment)
      • Combat Support (Cape Breton Highlanders)
      • TAPV Sqn (Princess Louise’s Fusiliers)
    • 42 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Royal Newfoundland Regiment)
      • B Coy (Royal New Brunswick Regiment)
      • C Coy (PEI Regiment)
      • Combat Support (The North Shore Regiment)
      • TAPV Sqn (8th Canadian Hussars)
    • 40 Provisional Field Artillery Group
      • 3 x Field Battery
    • 40 Engineer Group
      • 3 x Field Sqn
    • 40 Support Bn
      • 3 x dispersed Support Groups
The “dispersed support groups” function more as standards teams travelling and ensuring everyone is on the same page. I leave engineering groups fairly open as it’s not my area of expertise. The Artillery batteries would largely be provincial; and if necessary dispersed at troop level. The combat support companies are place holders, would be actually organized in large population centres to hopefully pull maximum numbers of trained pers. Some unit names have moved from RCAC to RCIC, that’s simply to ensure that we don’t hold capabilities in more isolated areas of the country. I’m sure they’ll be fine in their new roles. One key point would be that this gets away from small towns only having one unit available to them; The batteries and Sqns would have dets pushed out to give prospective young Canadians and breadth of options.

I've been a member of most of the units in your '10 Bde' over the years.

I understand your good intentions, admire your optimism, and will wave from the sidelines with a smile on my face knowing that I will not have to have anything to do with trying to establish that formaiton ;)
 

daftandbarmy

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Res F pay: Reg F monthly rate x 12, / 365, x 92.8%

So it is calculated on a calendar daily rate, not a working day rate.

If you are a full time reservist, you get the 92.8%. Part time, if you work notional full time hours for a week, you get five, not seven, days pay

And, bonus points, you also save the VAC the trouble of paying you out the CAF Education and Training Credit to thousands of well trained, committed troops because there's no way in Hell that 90% of ARes members will ever accumulate enough time to qualify ;)
 

GR66

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That's 37 mandays, as in full days. This has to cover everything from AAG/DAG nights, range exercises, FTX events, training nights, Mandatory Online Courses, Admin/CQ stuff, Remembrance Day, Bde Concentrations etc etc. Sometimes you can scrape up additional mandays for courses.

I've been around the block with every conceivable type of training schedule over the years and have found that the one weekend per month, one night per week, is definitely the most effective.

Things change so fast that if you don't see the troops at least once per week, you quickly fall behind in being able to prepare for the latest 'fast ball'.

You also tend to lose people with 'real jobs' and families etc as their weekends are really important.
Is the highlighted part maybe a big part of the problem? Other than deploying for a natural disaster, etc. there really shouldn't be any "fastballs" when it comes to training schedules, etc. Any reason that the annual schedule couldn't be posted on Day 1 of the new Fiscal Year?
 

GR66

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To better create argument and bickering. I once again submit my proposed reorganization of the reserves into regional Bdes and roughly provincial regiments.

  • 10 Canadian Rifle Brigade
    • 11 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Seaforth Highlanders of Canada
      • B Coy (Canadian Scottish)
      • C Coy (Royal Westminster Regiment)
      • Combat Support (Rocky Mountain Rangers)
      • TAPV Sqn (British Columbia Dragoons / British Columbia Regiment)
    • 12 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Loyal Edmonton Regiment)
      • B Coy (Calgary Highlanders)
      • C Coy (Royal Regina Rifles)
      • Combat Support (North Sask Regiment)
      • TAPV Sqn (Sask Dragoons / Kings Own Calgary Regiment)
    • 13 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Royal Winnipeg Rifles)
      • B Coy ( Winnipeg Grenadiers)
      • C Coy (we don’t need two Cameron Highlanders, then at Ottawa can have a fight over it)
      • Combat Support (Lake Superior Scottish Regiment)
      • TAPV Sqn (Fort Gary Horse)
    • 10 Provisional Field Artillery Group
      • 3 x Field Battery
    • 10 Engineer Group
      • 3 x Field Sqn
    • 10 Support Bn
      • 3 x dispersed Support Groups
  • 20 Canadian Rifle Brigade
    • 21 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Royal Hamilton Light Infantry)
      • B Coy (Essex and Kent Scottish / Argyl and Sutherland Highlanders)
      • C Coy (Grey and Simcoe Foresters)
      • Combat Support (Royal Highland Fusiliers)
      • TAPV Sqn (Windsor Regiment)
    • 22 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Toronto Scottish / 48th Highlanders / Lorne Scots)
      • B Coy (Queens own Rifles of Canada)
      • C Coy (Royal Regiment of Canada)
      • Combat Support (Lincoln and Welland Regiment / Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment)
      • TAPV Sqn (Queens York Rangers)
    • 23 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Ontario Highlanders (Cameron, Stormont, Dundas and Glengary Highlanders))
        • Governor Generals Foot Guards (ceremonial)
      • B Coy (Irish Regiment of Canada)
      • C Coy (Princes of Wales own Regiment of Canada)
      • Combat Support (the Algonquin Regiment / Brockville Rifles)
      • TAPV Sqn (Ontario Regiment )
        • Governor Generals Horse Guards (ceremonial)
    • 20 Provisional Field Artillery Group
      • 3 x Field Battery
    • 20 Engineer Group
      • 3 x Field Sqn
    • 20 Support Bn
      • 3 x dispersed Support Groups
  • 30 Brigade du Voltigeur Canadian
    • 31 Voltigeur Canadian
      • A Coy (Black Watch of Canada)
        • Canadian Grenadier Guards (ceremonial)
      • B Coy (Regiment de Maisonnueve)
      • C Coy (Fusiliers Mont-Royal)
      • Combat Support (Royal Montreal Regiment)
      • TAPV Sqn (Royal Canadian Hussars / Regiment du Hull)
    • 32 Voltigeur Canadian
      • A Coy (Voltigeur du Quebec)
        • Citadel Guard (no longer wasting 2 R22R’s time)
      • B Coy (la Regiment de Chaudiere)
      • C Coy (la Regiment de Saguenay)
      • Combat Support (Fusilier de Sherbrooke et St Lauren)
      • TAPV Sqn (Sherbrooke Hussars)
    • 30 Provisional Field Artillery Group
      • 3 x Field Battery
    • 30 Engineer Group
      • 3 x Field Sqn
    • 30 Support Bn
      • 3 x dispersed Support Groups
  • 40 Canadian Rifle Brigade
    • 41 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Halifax Rifles)
      • B Coy (West Nova Scotia Regiment)
      • C Coy (Nova Scotia Regiment)
      • Combat Support (Cape Breton Highlanders)
      • TAPV Sqn (Princess Louise’s Fusiliers)
    • 42 Canadian Mounted Rifles
      • A Coy (Royal Newfoundland Regiment)
      • B Coy (Royal New Brunswick Regiment)
      • C Coy (PEI Regiment)
      • Combat Support (The North Shore Regiment)
      • TAPV Sqn (8th Canadian Hussars)
    • 40 Provisional Field Artillery Group
      • 3 x Field Battery
    • 40 Engineer Group
      • 3 x Field Sqn
    • 40 Support Bn
      • 3 x dispersed Support Groups
The “dispersed support groups” function more as standards teams travelling and ensuring everyone is on the same page. I leave engineering groups fairly open as it’s not my area of expertise. The Artillery batteries would largely be provincial; and if necessary dispersed at troop level. The combat support companies are place holders, would be actually organized in large population centres to hopefully pull maximum numbers of trained pers. Some unit names have moved from RCAC to RCIC, that’s simply to ensure that we don’t hold capabilities in more isolated areas of the country. I’m sure they’ll be fine in their new roles. One key point would be that this gets away from small towns only having one unit available to them; The batteries and Sqns would have dets pushed out to give prospective young Canadians and breadth of options.
You can bicker over the details, unit naming and the assignments, but this is basically what many/most Reserve Napkin force submitters here have been suggesting for years..."right size" the Reserve Regiments as Companies/Squadrons/Batteries to reflect their actual strength.

Once you accept this fact you can tinker with Reg Force/Reserve Force augmentation levels, specific roles, etc.
 

Brad Sallows

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As I wrote, I meant specifically the CO: Commanding Officer. When we understood our planning figure to be 37.5 days overall, it was also understood that whatever the greater burdens a CO faced were, up to 60 days was considered reasonable.

I heard that number might have been adjusted upward since a couple of decades ago, but I'd prefer some confirmation.
 

dapaterson

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And, bonus points, you also save the VAC the trouble of paying you out the CAF Education and Training Credit to thousands of well trained, committed troops because there's no way in Hell that 90% of ARes members will ever accumulate enough time to qualify ;)
Factor in courses as a student and instructor, plus the 1.4x plus up for class A days, and reaching the approximately 2200 days needed is not insurmountable for individuals.

Assume over a 25 year period, the equivalent of one year class B on various courses, two six month class C deployments, and 46 days class A annually, on average, for the remaining time. Voila. Qualified.
 

dapaterson

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As I wrote, I meant specifically the CO: Commanding Officer. When we understood our planning figure to be 37.5 days overall, it was also understood that whatever the greater burdens a CO faced were, up to 60 days was considered reasonable.

I heard that number might have been adjusted upward since a couple of decades ago, but I'd prefer some confirmation.
Last version of the funding model I saw was materially greater.

I was averaging 80+ a year, plus some days of leave with pay for military service per my collective agreement.

Edit: and I was on the low end compared to peers.
 

Brad Sallows

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OK. I heard 100, which struck me as ridiculous. (For anyone wondering: that would be the number of Class A days a CO could sign for, without prompting a lot of questions about whether there was really that much work to be done.) That's a lot of extra time to put in for anyone with a full-time job.

I'm on board with cutting the Res F rank ceiling in units by one level, simply because Res F competence rarely matches the expectations most people have for LCol and CWO.

But it's improbable that the COs are not worth what they're paid (too lazy to look up current pay rates and figure out what the hourly rate is based on 8 hours in a full day), and that "the system" thinks they need to be funded to do 100, or even 80, days of work. Why so much work? How could it be distributed or reduced? How likely is it that the time commitment is causing some fraction of potentially useful candidates for the appointment to drop out somewhere along the way, thus aggravating the competence issue?
 

dapaterson

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Time commitment is preposterous, as many functions cannot be delegated. In my case, there were additional full time functions pushed to the unit that require additional time and effort.

The primary friction point was a lack of planning at many higher HQs, so everything becomes a continual panic.

A simplified breakdown: for nine months a year, average one and a half evenings a week, two weekends a month, for eight days monthly.

For the summer, about three days a month (all in).

That's 81 days. Plus email access constantly.
 

daftandbarmy

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Time commitment is preposterous, as many functions cannot be delegated. In my case, there were additional full time functions pushed to the unit that require additional time and effort.

That's 81 days. Plus email access constantly.

.... hundreds of emails a month with the expectation that you will respond immediately 'or else' ;)
 

Rifleman62

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To answer some of the emails you needed to have all the info (files) at hand which you probably didn't which meant a trip to the Armory or a call of to the RSSO if they were in the issue picture.
Lots of these emails were generated by Staff Capts at Div HQ to answer queries to them by higher. They look good if they can give an "immediate" answer.
 

Eye In The Sky

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Cl A nights for Trg are a waste of time. Admin only. Exception would be prior to a weekend FXT to prep, do BP etc.

Back in my Res Armd Recce days, we made good use of Cl A trg nights. Even after we went to 1 trg night/week (Thurs). Eg - est a Mtd Op Screen, to exercise all steps of BP. At 2100hrs on a Trg night, issue a Wng O with task of Est Mtd Op Screen by Tp Ldr. BP - starts, ends at 2200hrs. Enough time to get things rolling.

Next Thurs night, BP continues. Drivers and Obs are at veh park, crew commanders are recieving orders, etc. Issue orders at veh park. Move out, establish Mtd OP screen by H-hour. Once last OP Report is sent - ENDEX. Return to armouries, de-kit veh's, return kit to lockers, Stables as needed, hot wash in the Mess with a cold one and a slice of pizza.

Morale was pretty good back in those days. Of course, there was enough veh's to field 7 car Recce tps, and those veh's had comms. Double-banked comms, even.

Imagine that.

Jan - winter indoc/warface. One trg night, go over tent group kit, march discipline and all that stuff. tobaggans ready to go. Next trg night, everyone brought in FMO, got into tent groups, did a short march, up pole/down pole, march back. sort kit back out, wpns secured, Wng O issued for winter indoc/warfare FTX that started 1800 the next night. It (Cl A trg nights) worked well, IMO...with motivated leaders.

After Stables on Sunday, there was always pizza and an open mess.

We'd usually be in the high 90%s for attendance back on those days...
 

daftandbarmy

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To answer some of the emails you needed to have all the info (files) at hand which you probably didn't which meant a trip to the Armory or a call of to the RSSO if they were in the issue picture.
Lots of these emails were generated by Staff Capts at Div HQ to answer queries to them by higher. They look good if they can give an "immediate" answer.

Yes... this was insane.

I recall the time the CO insisted that he didn't answer to random requests from Class B Captains at a distant Bde HQ. If they wanted something from him, he expected the COS to call.

I have no idea how that worked out for him...
 

Rifleman62

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Agree. Trg nights were for the mandatory, non trade specific, "training", as well as the prep for the FTX.

We did similar to your post except as a SVC BN. Each mbr had a pocket notebook with the years Trg Plan printed within. Annotations for BP at each level was Included.
 

Eye In The Sky

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Agree. Trg nights were for the mandatory, non trade specific, "training", as well as the prep for the FTX.

We did similar to your post except as a SVC BN. Each mbr had a pocket notebook with the years Trg Plan printed within. Annotations for BP at each level was Included.

We did our trade trg on those nights as well though. We were lucky though, in that we had a decent size trg area literally off the back step of the Armouries. Copps of woods, open fields, old runways...we could do lots of stuff "urban" armouries soldiers couldn't do. So, we were quite lucky.
 
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